Give thanks: the importance of following up

The big job interview you’ve been stressing over and preparing for is done, and now you can breathe a sigh of relief. However, if you think your part in the interview process is done and you’re just waiting to hear back, you’re missing out on a great opportunity to shine.

As Thanksgiving approaches, it’s important to think about how you can show gratitude in all areas of your life. For example, giving thanks after an interview could be the deciding factor in a job offer. According to some studies, only 10% of job candidates follow up after a job interview with a thank-you letter. Don’t assume the interviewer knows you are thankful – take the time to actually express your gratitude. If you’re among that 10%, you have the perfect opportunity to stand out.

So, how do you handle this important post-interview correspondence? Give thanks by using these six tips below.

1. Follow up quickly.

As soon as your job interview is over, send a follow-up email or letter to the company. Following up is a critical step in showing your continued interest, but don’t pester the recruiter. A carefully written thank-you note or email will help keep your name at the top of recruiters’ lists.

2. Make the message personal.

Don’t send a standard thank-you template to every person who interviews you. Find the significant points you discussed in the interview and mention the little details you learned about the company and the interviewer. This shows that you not only paid attention during the job interview, but remembered what the company thinks is important.

3. Always say thank you.

The first line of your message should always start with sincere gratitude for the time and interest of the interviewer. After that, be specific about how your experience and skills can benefit the company. Add any other skills that you didn’t get a chance to talk about during the interview, and end the message with another heartfelt thanks.

4. Fit into the culture.

When crafting your message, consider the company culture. If the company is more traditional, craft your thank-you letter in a more formal manner with a hand-written thank-you note or business letter. In some instances, an email may be more appropriate.

5. Proofread and proofread again.

Before you send your thank-you note, proofread it. Then proofread it again. Have a friend or family member proofread it after that. A well-written thank you falls flat if your note is full of errors or if you spelled the interviewer’s name wrong. Be conscientious when crafting your thank-you letter.

6. Follow up, but don’t pester.

Once you’ve sent your first thank-you message, allow for a week to pass before contacting the company again. During your interview, you may also ask for a general time frame as to when to expect an answer. If you didn’t get the job, request feedback on how to improve your interview skills, and follow up any feedback with another thank-you message.

You can’t go wrong by expressing thanks. Whether you aced the interview or bombed it, you at least had the chance to show off your potential. Interviews are stressful for both the job seeker and the employer, but a well-crafted and sincere thank-you note can ease the agony of waiting to hear back.

EXPRESS EMPLOYMENT PROFESSIONALS

WEBSITE: http://grandrapidsmi.expresspros.com

CONTACT US: jobs.grandrapidsmi@expresspros.com

VIEW JOBS: http://grandrapidsmiexpresspros.com/jobs/search/

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